12 comments for “Ozy And Millie

  1. How do “they” know no two snow flakes are the same? In all the eons that it has snowed all over the world, you have to suspect at least two look exactly like each other at one time or other.

    • I believe the odds were once estimated by a physicist at the university of Phoenix to be one in 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000.
      If you’re a bit overwhelmed by that number it’s a one followed by 768 zeros. That’s how many possible permutations there are of a snowflakes shape. The second largest number with a commonly used name is a googol which only has 100 zeros. So the odds are as close to zero as you can get.

      • So, a lot lot lot lot lot lot lot lot lot lot of possibilities. That makes getting a Sparkle Snup seem actually possible. (1/1000)

    • Actually, this is a myth, snowflake formation follow several different but consistent patterns, and identical snowflakes are quite common.

  2. it went down to mathematical probability as I recall, that the chances of one forming the same way as another are extremely remote. The “no two” just put it in understandable terms for the layperson

    • That might be the case for any particular two flakes, maybe they only have 1 chance in trillions or more, but there are still a lot of snowflakes to say no two are the same.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.