21 comments for “Ozy and Millie: Fairness cake

  1. What, her mom didn’t convince her she was wrong!? Now I’m f-ing mad! The ignorant teacher and principal should be fired! Now I’m crying. 🙁

    • I get upset like that for similar reasons, except it tends to be with regards to politicians and bureaucratic public institutions rather than school administration and faculty.

      • But consider what Ms. Mudd did accomplish: she taught her daughter that there are ways to make life even out, despite the immobility of the entrenched bureaucracies. That, to my eye, is a great victory, indeed.

  2. …Criminy, Dana, what kind of school district did you grow up in?!
    I got picked on a lot for being the “weird kid” but in my case, the school actually did something about it, and arranged for me to start meeting with a guidance counselor daily, and their helpfulness only increased when I was diagnosed with Asperger’s. My teachers were very forgiving of me, giving extensions on deadlines and explaining the whys behind social behavior. As a matter of fact, the school psychologist and my parents became very good friends, and they still keep in touch, despite the distance of states and time.

    • Actually, most of the bullying strips are based on my school experiences, which were much worse than Dana’s. I went to school in a small, rural-ish town in Michigan. It was not a tolerant environment for little weirdos like me.

    • …I wish our school had psychologists that did something other than take anonymous surveys. I’m envious and I want to cry.

      Although I never got punished for fighting back with anything other than humiliation for crying in the process and having the whole class laugh at me as a result…

    • There are occasionally some decent people in positions of power in school administrations. I’m sad to say that occurrences like this aren’t uncommon, though. I’ve experienced them myself.

    • I was never bullied this badly, though I was certainly picked on for being the strange kid. However, in my experience the problem was never that the teachers were unwilling to listen and believe, but that there simply weren’t any effective options available. The official recourse was to arrange a formal meeting between the bully and the victim, in which the victim explains that being bullied hurts, and that they would appreciate it if the bully stopped doing it. The bully, of course, has a field day with this ‘solution’. Unofficially, one or two of my teachers has mentioned that responding in kind actually works to stop the situation and that they’ll turn a blind eye if they know about the situation. I’ve been good friends with some of my teachers, and I believe them when they say that it isn’t that they don’t want to stop it, it’s that they really don’t know how either.

    • Whatever school district YOU grew up in has some very bizarre attitudes compared to the norm, which is far closer to this comic than you’d like to think.

    • Some of the teachers stood up for me with the bullies. It wasn’t as bad as Millie is having it in that regard.
      Of course, Ozy & Millie have just one bully and I had a score, so in *that* regard it was worse.

    • I went tchool in a small town in Connecticut and this is 100% accurate.

      One time 3 kids cornered me and started shouting and threatening me. A girl came over and told them to leave me alone. She didn’t scream or threaten or get violent, just told them to stop.

      When we went into the principals office, the three kids got a slap on the wrist, the principal soent most of the time lecturing the girl who had helped me because she should have gotten a teacher instead.

  3. Thankfully, the one time I was accused of hitting someone (although I didn’t actually hit him; I had never even seen him before), the administration was wise enough to not do anything because I had quite a record of reporting every abuse that targeted me. Given I had never even met the guy, they found it very unlikely that I hit him (especially because I’m not muscular, and he said I left a bruise on his face, and the timing of the incident was quite off from what I had actually been doing).

  4. With luck, maybe Millie will get even with her teacher.

    “Mmmmm, this cake is sooo delicious Ms. Sorkowitz. Too bad you’re on a diet. MMMMM!”

  5. The problem is, Millicent’s mother is only one person. To break through a firmly entrenched bureaucracy, it takes trillions of people, each making the effort of a thousand people (in other words, the equivalent of quadrillions of people) to move it just an inch.

    *puts a nickel in the Unnecessary Hyperbole Jar*

    • We have the internet. If we spread the word we might get the entire intelligent part of cyberspace to push for common sense in law enforcement. Yeah, it goes beyond school, but when you think about it, so does everything that starts there.

      • Intelligent part of cyberspace? So, around 12…13 people?

        Takes a nickel from the unnecessary Hyperbole jar.

        How else do you justify it have only 15-16 nickels in it?

          • Averagemoe, Bombom thinks that he has made an accurate statement — that’s why he thinks he deserves the nickle. But Bombom! Aren’t there more than 12-13 of *us*???

  6. In junior high school, I got put into detention three times-two for being late and one for fighting with a classmate. The fight hardly started when it was stopped, but we both got the penalty.

    But guess what? It actually impressed my classmates when I got put into detention for fighting, even though I was hardly a pacifist. Surprised nobody thought to have something like that presented in this story arc.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.